Category Archives: diagrams

Los Angeles 2024 Olympic venue plan impresses IOC committee in bid visit

LOS ANGELES – Following a visit to evaluate Los Angeles’ bid for the 2024 Olympics, the International Olympic Committee’s commission couldn’t pick one adjective to describe the proposed venues.

So it chose many, all superlative, to describe what the group had seen over its three-day visit here last week.

As that commission takes its tour of Paris, which concludes Tuesday, it is LA 2024’s venue plan that left the impression bid leaders had hoped for. That plan, one which does not require the construction of any permanent venues, is one that they hope can help them secure the Games.

“The commission members were almost ecstatic about the level of the venues that they’ve found and that they’ve seen and that they’ve been able to meet those people that manage those venues,” said Patrick Baumann, chair of the IOC’s evaluation commission. “It goes from spectacular venues to impressive venues to mind-blowing venues to incredible venues. That certainly is an incredibly positive thing. And it’s positive because we’ve been able to really see them.” Continue reading

USP OLYMPIC PREVIEW: IOC COMMISSION VISIT LA2024 S OLY USA CA

New Design for the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art

In January, Angelenos were elated to discover that Star Wars creator George Lucas has selected Exposition Park as the future site of his Museum of Narrative Art.  An upcoming presentation to the Los Angeles City Planning Commission has unveiled new renderings for the $1-billion project, suggesting changes from the initial designs presented last year.

Slated for two city-owned parking lots on Vermont Avenue south of Exposition Boulevard, the museum would take the form of a four-story, 115-foot tall building featuring 300,000 square feet of floor area.  Plans call for a vacation of 39th Street between Vermont Avenue and Bill Robertson Lane, allowing for the construction of an underground parking garage across the site featuring more than 2,400 vehicle spaces.  The subterranean garage levels would be capped with 11 acres of public green space. continu reading

Quiz: Which Los Angeles neighborhood should you live in? This quiz will divine the perfect LA neighborhood for your personality

Los Angeles is a city of eclectic neighborhoods—your LA experience and your day-to-day life will be completely different in Venice than in Koreatown, or in Highland Park or Calabasas. So are you living in the right place? Which one is the right neighborhood for you? Our quiz will do all the hard work of figuring that out for you, peering into your soul and finding the place that’ll fit your needs. Have fun! Continu reading

A retro map of LA is reimagined with film titles. Sur Cette CArte De Los Angeles, Les Noms Des Rues Sont Remplaces Par Les Films Tourne Sur Ses Rues

Looking for the perfect gift for the cartography/cinema nerd in your life? Aren’t we all?

Well, you’re in luck, because Los Angeles Magazine has turned us onto just the thing for map and movie geeks everywhere. Liverpool-based design studio Dorothy has created a vintage-style map of Los Angeles, replacing the streets and sights of the city with film titles and movie references.

The Dorothy map takes quite a few liberties with LA geography, so it’s not exactly the Thomas Guide. On this map, LAX looks to be several miles in length, the Titanic sank in the Silver Lake Reservoir (pre-draining presumably), and Griffith Park is located in the neighborhood of Zombieland. Continu reading

How the Oscars spent 73 years looking for a home A journey through the many venues of the Academy Awards

“Just Another example of Los Angeles The Goat To be. The Oscars is In Hollywood Los Angeles Tomorrow Night.  If you Have all The Stars in Los Angeles why do The Oscors else where?” for your information the Oscars have some thing to do with movies and the Academy Award  some thing to do with Music and they all are call entertainment  And They all are mostly run In Los Angeles. The capital Of Entertainment” Do you have something to say about that? The last time I checked Los Angeles was the city of Angeles. continu to read

View from the street of the Chinese Theatre as guests arrive for the Academy Awards.Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection

In 1949, the ceremonies were held in their strangest and most mysterious venue. Only days before the show, AMPAS announced that they would be holding the Oscars not on a soundstage as they planned, but in the “Academy Awards Theater” at their headquarters on Wilshire Boulevard in West Hollywood. Since the theater only sat 950 people, attendance was limited to “nominees, studio personnel involved with presentations and the press.”

In 1953, AMPAS finally allowed their arch-rival, television, to broadcast the show.

Officially, AMPAS claimed they had made the decision so they could put more of their money into cultural and educational programs. They were supposedly pleased with the decision, stating, “It has always been hoped to center activities of the organization in its own establishment.” According to film historian Robert Osborne, this was a bunch of malarkey. The sudden change was the direct result of the growing distrust of the studio system:

The major Hollywood studios—MGM, 20th Century Fox, Warner Bros., Paramount and RKO Radio—had withdrawn their financial support of the awards in order to remove rumors that they had been trying to exert their influence on voters. The new, shrunken seating capacity made it impossible to accommodate more than a fraction of those who hoped to attend, and the last-minute withdrawal of studio support had left no time for Academy officials to raise the needed funds to rent a larger location.

This experiment seems to have been a dismal failure. In 1950, the Oscars moved to the B. Marcus Priteca-designed Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, where they would stay for 10 years.

In 1953, AMPAS finally allowed their arch-rival, television, to broadcast the show. Millions of viewers across the country watched as Bob Hope hosted the proceedings from the palatial Art Deco theater. According to the LA Times, the interior of the Pantages reflected the change:

The stage was banked with flowers and plants and surmounted by Roman columns and a large Oscar as usual but something new had been added. At the back of the stage stood a giant TV screen, and smaller ones were scattered strategically throughout the auditorium. On all these screens the business on stage was repeated ad infinitum.

In 1961, the show moved again, this time to the new Welton Becket-designed Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, far from what most considered the heartbeat of Hollywood. “Interest in the Oscar and the awards continued to grow,” Robert Osborne writes in his book 80 Years of Oscar. “Simultaneously, the audience capacity at the Pantages…had been reduced…and after investigation, no other auditorium in the area was found by the Academy to be either big enough or available on the dates required.” Much to everyone’s surprise, the far-flung venue was a hit, according to the LA Times:

The Civic Auditorium in the Bay City proved to be the most spacious and commodious of the academy’s several one night stands down through the years. A looming expanse just a shell’s throw from the blue Pacific…of steel, glass, concrete, gala banners and welcoming red carpets. But the early night chill seeping in from the sea cast no damper on the proceedings taking place in this modern, sloping, pillarless (nobody sat behind a post) amphitheater packed with industry notables.

The Awards would stay at the Civic for most of the 1960s. In 1969, they moved to the theater most people now associate with the Oscars—the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center in Downtown Los Angeles. Opened in 1964, the Pavilion was designed by Civic Auditorium architect Welton Becket in the New Formalism style.

In 1969, Downtown welcomed Hollywood with open arms, proclaiming the ceremony was back “after 40 years in the provinces.”

The Music Center’s construction was spearheaded by Dorothy Chandler, a member of one of the blue-blooded families that had once shunned Hollywood folk. Now, Downtown welcomed Hollywood with open arms, proclaiming the ceremony was back “after 40 years in the provinces.” The theater sat 3,197 people and bleachers were set up for another 3,000 spectators outside the venue. “In the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion the show will for the first time enjoy facilities suitable for what has evolved into not only a glittering social event but also a big and complicated theatrical production,” the LA Times enthused.

The Oscars stayed at the Pavilion for almost two decades and become synonymous in the public’s mind with the increasingly popular televised show. Many were shocked in 1988 when AMPAS chose to hold the sixtieth Academy Awards at the then rather decrepit Shrine Auditorium. Its reasons were twofold—the Shrine could accommodate almost twice as many people, and the venue gave the Academy more rehearsal days.

Until 2002, the Awards bounced between the “cold vastness of the Shrine” and the “cramped confines of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.” When the Oscars were held at the Pavilion, there was a frenzy each year over who got tickets. When it was held at the Shrine, many grumbled over its unsafe location, dingy accommodations, and a backstage so small reporters were “crammed in a tent.”

Oscar statues clustered inside the lobby of the Dolby Theatre.Elizabeth Daniels

These difficulties increasingly convinced the Academy that they needed a home of their own that would meet the many needs of the enormous telecast. This problem was solved when the Academy was approached by TrizecHahn Corporation, who wanted to build a grand new theater complex on Hollywood Boulevard.

AMPAS collaborated with TrizecHahn to build the perfect Academy Awards venue. “It had to be glamorous and beautiful, which we believe it is,” said Bob Rehme, former Academy president. “We wanted it designed to hold a live TV show, with a permanent main camera position. It had to have a large stage, like the Shrine or Radio City Music Hall. And it had to have a very large orchestra pit that could hold 75 musicians—no Broadway show has that big an orchestra.”

On March 24, 2002, the 74th Academy Awards were held at the new Kodak Theatre, just a stone’s throw away from the Roosevelt Hotel, where the journey had begun 73 shows before. For better or worse, the Academy Awards has finally come home—for now.

Mapped: The 30+ new buildings taking over Koreatown

http://la.curbed.com/maps/koreatown-map-development-construction-new-buildings

Los Angeles is always evolving, but some neighborhoods change faster than others. A few years from now, it’s hard to imagine any part of the city looking as different as Koreatown. With new buildings going up left and right, entire blocks could be nearly unrecognizable in a relatively short amount of time.

Much of the area’s development activity is concentrated around the Wilshire corridor, but a number of projects are also popping up to the north and south. And one development firm in particular seems to be on a mission to singlehandedly reinvent the neighborhood.

We’ve mapped out all the major projects that have been proposed or are under construction in the area. It gives a sense of just how appealing the area seems to have become for developers. Continu reading

California: Don’t Leave America. Bring America To Us. If CAlifornia Was A Country, CAlifornia Would Have Been The 7th Largest Economy In The world

For many of us in California, the election of Donald Trump came as a sobering reminder that, despite our state’s status as the 7th largest economy in the world and our commitments to environmental stewardship, inclusion, justice, and equity, we still represent just 1/8th of America’s population. Many of our fellow countrymen do not share these Californian values, or they feel shut out from the opportunity we enjoy here. In response, they’re sending us all down very different path than the one we’ve outlined for ourselves. Continu reading

What Los Angeles Metro could Be in 2040. A quoi Le Metro Systeme De Los Angeles Peut resemble en 2040

Los Angeles has long been notorious for being a car-based city — good luck getting around town using public transportation. While some manage to make a go of it between rail and buses, hobbyist designer Nick Andert put together a look at what the Metro system could look like with widespread political will, though Andert admits in his posts on Reddit that it might be more likely to see this kind of system in 40 years instead of 30. Continu to read

Los Angeles malgres Son Age de 235 ans d existence Comparet a Paris plus de 4000 ans d existance progresse a une vitesse exceptionel. a quoi ressemblerai son Metro en 2040 si le vote mis en place d augmenter les taxes indefiniment   a 1/2 cent passe.

Rio Olympics 2016 Latest Medal Count: Gold, Silver And Bronze Totals For USA, China, Others Entering Day 5:Comme D habitude Le Plus Jeune Pays Domine et le Reste se suivent

There was never any doubt that USA’s “Final Five” would win gold. Defeating second-place Russia by eight points, Biles, Aly Raisman, Gabby Douglas, Madison Kocian and Laurie Hernandez gave Team USA back-to-back gold medals in the event. continu to read

Michael Phelps

2016 Rio Live Olympic Medal Board

Rank Country

Total

Gold Silver Bronze
Sources:
International Olympic Committee and 1 more. Show details 
International Olympic Committee (olympic.org)
The International Olympic Committee is an international, non-profit, non-governmental organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland. The Olympic Games are the exclusive property of the International Olympic Committee, which is the supreme authority for all matters concerning the Games.
World Anti-Doping Organization (wada-ama.org)
The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) was established in 1999 as an international independent agency composed and funded equally by the sport movement and governments of the world. Its key activities include scientific research, education, development of anti-doping capacities, and monitoring of the World Anti Doping Code – the document harmonizing anti-doping policies in all sports and all countries.

Data Sets:

2014 Anti-Doping Rules Violations (ADRVS) Report (wada-main-prod.s3.amazonaws.com).
As of February 21, 2016; refreshed Yearly.
The ADRVs Report provides information regarding all ADRVs, which includes the outcomes of AAFs detected by WADA-accredited laboratories and also ADRVs that resulted from nonanalytical findings. The data on urine and blood samples analyzed and the resulting AAFs are taken from WADA’s 2014 Testing Figures Report (published in July 2015). The results for all samples were submitted by WADA-accredited laboratories directly into the Anti-Doping Administration and Management System (ADAMS), the organization’s centralized online database. Aggregated data on the outcomes of AAFs, as well as all the data on the Non-Analytical Findings (case decisions) were compiled by WADA based on decisions provided by Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs).