Tag Archives: california

Long Beach’s Tallest Building Set to Break Ground 35-story tower would rise at Ocean Boulevard and Alamitos Avenue.

Long Beach’s new tallest building is preparing to break ground at the corner of Ocean Boulevard and Alamitos Avenue, according to LongBeachize.
The project, a follow-up to the $70-million Current apartment tower next-door, calls for the construction of a 35-story building that would feature 315 residential units, approximately 6,700 square feet of commercial space and five levels of subterranean parking accommodations for 458 vehicles.
LongBeachize reports that the new building, which is tentatively called the East Tower, will feature a mix of studio, one- and two-bedroom apartments ranging from 520 square feet to 1,176 square feet in size.
Carrier Johnson + Culture and RELM Studio are designing the project, which would rise to a maximum height of 417 feet above street level, eclipsing the Long Beach World Trade Center.  It would be located across a 10,000-square-foot public plaza which will be shared with the Current. Continue reading

One Beverly Hills Development Begins Work

Work is now beginning for One Beverly Hills, the Richard Meier-designed hotel and condominium complex that will rise on the former site of a posh May Company department store.

The below image, snapped by real estate agent Blake Alexander, shows excavation in process for the project from the Dalian Wanda Group, which is budgeted in excess of $1 billion.

The mixed-use development will create 13- and 15-story buildings on a property spanning between Wilshire and Santa Monica Boulevards.  A full buildout of the development will create 193 residential units, 134 hotel rooms and restaurant space. continu reading

LA 2024 Olympics not likely to be a financial disaster, according to a state report

Released by the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, it suggests the city could host a low-cost and low-risk games—should it win its bid.

Only two prospective host cities, Los Angeles and Paris, remain in the hunt for the 2024 Olympic games. Two other finalists, Rome and Budapest, dropped out of the race in part because of concerns about the kind of cost overruns that have plagued recent games.

After demonstrators took to the streets in Rio de Janeiro to protest the costs associated with the most recent games, Angelenos can’t be blamed for being concerned about the negative effects of hosting—especially amid mounting evidence that it’s simply a losing proposition. But a new report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office suggests that the city’s plan for a fiscally responsible games will keep the risks of major financial losses relatively low. continu to read

For Those Who Think Los Angeles Has Too Many Buildings Being Built. This Is New York City And Under Neath Los Angeles, California. I do not See People In New York Crying About Traffic and Too Many Buildings, Instead They Seem to Enjoy it.

For Those who Thinks Los Angeles has too many buildings. This is New York City, New York.

This is Los Angeles, California

 

Watch Inglewood’s $2.6-Billion NFL Stadium Rise Live camera tracks progress on the future home of the Rams and Chargers.

With an estimated budget of $2.6 billion, Inglewood’s new NFL stadium may be the most expensive ground-up development underway in Los Angeles County.  A camera perched above the sprawling construction site now offers a real time look at progress on the future 70,000-seat venue, which will soon be home to both the Rams and the Chargers. At this point, the project appears to be little more than a vast dirt lot, although the level of activity on the property will undoubtedly increase as the stadium approaches its 2019 opening date. Continu reading

How the Oscars spent 73 years looking for a home A journey through the many venues of the Academy Awards

“Just Another example of Los Angeles The Goat To be. The Oscars is In Hollywood Los Angeles Tomorrow Night.  If you Have all The Stars in Los Angeles why do The Oscors else where?” for your information the Oscars have some thing to do with movies and the Academy Award  some thing to do with Music and they all are call entertainment  And They all are mostly run In Los Angeles. The capital Of Entertainment” Do you have something to say about that? The last time I checked Los Angeles was the city of Angeles. continu to read

View from the street of the Chinese Theatre as guests arrive for the Academy Awards.Los Angeles Public Library Photo Collection

In 1949, the ceremonies were held in their strangest and most mysterious venue. Only days before the show, AMPAS announced that they would be holding the Oscars not on a soundstage as they planned, but in the “Academy Awards Theater” at their headquarters on Wilshire Boulevard in West Hollywood. Since the theater only sat 950 people, attendance was limited to “nominees, studio personnel involved with presentations and the press.”

In 1953, AMPAS finally allowed their arch-rival, television, to broadcast the show.

Officially, AMPAS claimed they had made the decision so they could put more of their money into cultural and educational programs. They were supposedly pleased with the decision, stating, “It has always been hoped to center activities of the organization in its own establishment.” According to film historian Robert Osborne, this was a bunch of malarkey. The sudden change was the direct result of the growing distrust of the studio system:

The major Hollywood studios—MGM, 20th Century Fox, Warner Bros., Paramount and RKO Radio—had withdrawn their financial support of the awards in order to remove rumors that they had been trying to exert their influence on voters. The new, shrunken seating capacity made it impossible to accommodate more than a fraction of those who hoped to attend, and the last-minute withdrawal of studio support had left no time for Academy officials to raise the needed funds to rent a larger location.

This experiment seems to have been a dismal failure. In 1950, the Oscars moved to the B. Marcus Priteca-designed Pantages Theatre in Hollywood, where they would stay for 10 years.

In 1953, AMPAS finally allowed their arch-rival, television, to broadcast the show. Millions of viewers across the country watched as Bob Hope hosted the proceedings from the palatial Art Deco theater. According to the LA Times, the interior of the Pantages reflected the change:

The stage was banked with flowers and plants and surmounted by Roman columns and a large Oscar as usual but something new had been added. At the back of the stage stood a giant TV screen, and smaller ones were scattered strategically throughout the auditorium. On all these screens the business on stage was repeated ad infinitum.

In 1961, the show moved again, this time to the new Welton Becket-designed Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, far from what most considered the heartbeat of Hollywood. “Interest in the Oscar and the awards continued to grow,” Robert Osborne writes in his book 80 Years of Oscar. “Simultaneously, the audience capacity at the Pantages…had been reduced…and after investigation, no other auditorium in the area was found by the Academy to be either big enough or available on the dates required.” Much to everyone’s surprise, the far-flung venue was a hit, according to the LA Times:

The Civic Auditorium in the Bay City proved to be the most spacious and commodious of the academy’s several one night stands down through the years. A looming expanse just a shell’s throw from the blue Pacific…of steel, glass, concrete, gala banners and welcoming red carpets. But the early night chill seeping in from the sea cast no damper on the proceedings taking place in this modern, sloping, pillarless (nobody sat behind a post) amphitheater packed with industry notables.

The Awards would stay at the Civic for most of the 1960s. In 1969, they moved to the theater most people now associate with the Oscars—the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion at the Music Center in Downtown Los Angeles. Opened in 1964, the Pavilion was designed by Civic Auditorium architect Welton Becket in the New Formalism style.

In 1969, Downtown welcomed Hollywood with open arms, proclaiming the ceremony was back “after 40 years in the provinces.”

The Music Center’s construction was spearheaded by Dorothy Chandler, a member of one of the blue-blooded families that had once shunned Hollywood folk. Now, Downtown welcomed Hollywood with open arms, proclaiming the ceremony was back “after 40 years in the provinces.” The theater sat 3,197 people and bleachers were set up for another 3,000 spectators outside the venue. “In the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion the show will for the first time enjoy facilities suitable for what has evolved into not only a glittering social event but also a big and complicated theatrical production,” the LA Times enthused.

The Oscars stayed at the Pavilion for almost two decades and become synonymous in the public’s mind with the increasingly popular televised show. Many were shocked in 1988 when AMPAS chose to hold the sixtieth Academy Awards at the then rather decrepit Shrine Auditorium. Its reasons were twofold—the Shrine could accommodate almost twice as many people, and the venue gave the Academy more rehearsal days.

Until 2002, the Awards bounced between the “cold vastness of the Shrine” and the “cramped confines of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.” When the Oscars were held at the Pavilion, there was a frenzy each year over who got tickets. When it was held at the Shrine, many grumbled over its unsafe location, dingy accommodations, and a backstage so small reporters were “crammed in a tent.”

Oscar statues clustered inside the lobby of the Dolby Theatre.Elizabeth Daniels

These difficulties increasingly convinced the Academy that they needed a home of their own that would meet the many needs of the enormous telecast. This problem was solved when the Academy was approached by TrizecHahn Corporation, who wanted to build a grand new theater complex on Hollywood Boulevard.

AMPAS collaborated with TrizecHahn to build the perfect Academy Awards venue. “It had to be glamorous and beautiful, which we believe it is,” said Bob Rehme, former Academy president. “We wanted it designed to hold a live TV show, with a permanent main camera position. It had to have a large stage, like the Shrine or Radio City Music Hall. And it had to have a very large orchestra pit that could hold 75 musicians—no Broadway show has that big an orchestra.”

On March 24, 2002, the 74th Academy Awards were held at the new Kodak Theatre, just a stone’s throw away from the Roosevelt Hotel, where the journey had begun 73 shows before. For better or worse, the Academy Awards has finally come home—for now.

A First Glimpse of the District Square Development Residential-retail complex planned near Expo/Crenshaw Station.

A leasing brochure has unveiled renderings for the reimagined District Squre, a proposed mixed-use development that would rise steps from Expo/Crenshaw Station.

Charles Company, the Los Angeles-based real estate firm behind the project at Crenshaw Boulevard and Rodeo Road, revised its original plan for a 300,000-square-foot shopping center on the property in 2015.  According to a notice from the CRA/LA Governing Board, the updated proposal called for the addition of 200 residential units to the project, replacing some of the commercial space. Continu to read

Culver City’s Ivy Station to Break Ground in February 2017

Expo Line commuters who frequent Culver City Station may soon be in need of new parking accommodations, as work is expected to begin early next year for an ambitious mixed-use complex on an adjoining park-and-ride lot.

According to a notice sent out by Culver City, the 5.2-acre lot that abuts the station is expected to close “on or about” February 6, 2017, so that Lowe Enterprises may begin construction for the Ivy Station development.  The project, which is scheduled for completion in 2019, will consist of five-and-six-story buildings featuring 200 residential units, a 148-key hotel, 210,000 square feet of offices and over 36,000 square feet of ground-floor retail and restaurant space. Continu reading

Sleek Culver City Project Gets a New Developer

An eyecatching development slated for a prominent site in Downtown Culver City may finally be taking steps forward.

The Real Deal L.A. reports that on Tuesday, Hackman Capital Partners has purchased the development rights for a parking lot at 9300 Culver Boulevard from fellow real estate investment trust Hudson Pacific Properties.  The property, also known as Parcel B, is the site of a Culver Steps, a mixed-use complex that HPP had been pursuing with developer Combined Properties. Continu reading